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New Archery Products Thunderhead 125 Review

 

         


Package content

Ready to assemble...

Assembling broadheads with supplied wrench

POI is very similar to matched weight field point requiring minor scope adjustment (result shown at 30 yards)

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

I am always looking for bargain equipment but, more often than not, such a bargain ends up being disappointing on performance or quality side. I then came across the NAP Thunderhead 125 at $30 per box of 6 these days it is a bargain so how does it compare to other broadheads that come at $30 per 3?

TNSP Thunderhead is the middle brother of a family: there is a 100 grains version and a much heavier 170 grain version. The 170 grains Thunderhead is specifically designed for crossbows in order to move the arrow balance (FOC) forward. Another difference for the 170 is that it has a steel ferrule (hence the heavier weight) , the 170 model is also sold in 3 broadhead packages that include practice matched weight field points.

The NAP Thunderhead 125 is the IKEA version of a broadhead, in fact it does require some assembly.

The cardboard box contains six aluminum ferrules with steel tips (with chisel point) already in place, two sets of 9 razor sharp blades each and a plastic broadhead wrench that comes handy during assembly and 6 replacement O-Rings. The cardboard box besides the usual product data and warranty info has printed some basic assembly instructions.

The assembly is rather simple but, having to deal with sharp objects, you must be extremely careful and some precautions are mandatory.

·         Find a suitable working table where to assemble the broadheads;

·         Make sure the working area is safe and well lit

·         Manage the blades with extreme caution possibly wearing safety gloves

·         Remember that blades are RAZOR sharp !

·         Never leave assembled broadheads and unassembled pieces (ferrule, blades etc) hanging around where they may be picked up by other people (especially childrens ) unaware of danger!

  

 Assembly

Now let’s put our broadheads together:

Insert the ferrule into the wrench triangular hole, keep the wrench with one hand with the ferrule point down , insert the blades into the ferrule slots then move the steel collar down to lock the blades, finally screw on the arrow and store the arrow in a safe place. You need to screw the broadhead onto the arrow to keep the blades in position. An OR is set between the arrow insert and the steel collar in order to prevent the broadhead from unscrewing.

How does it work?

Field testing revealed that the difference in point of impact from a field point with the same weight is rather minimal with both 4” and 5” fletching (commercial arrows) however I recommend some testing with your own specific setup combination of arrow weight, fletching size, arrow balance (FOC)  , and arrow speed in order to archive proper pinpoint accuracy and scope setup.

Hunting performance is just awesome: I used the Thunderhead 125 in my very first boar hunt and the stopping power is just tremendous, the boar was front hit, the arrow went in almost to fletching depth, the boar went just tree yards before dropping dead. The broadhead was later removed from the ribs onto the other side of the chest the only damage was one bent blade.

The Thunderhead 125 can be easily unassembled for maintenance as well as for blade replacement, just in case you are not skilled or do not want to deal with blade sharpening.

( I never replaced the bent blade of my first hunt as I framed it in memory of the hunt…)

Conclusion

The New Archery Products Thunderhead 125 is a terrific broadhead: it is rather inexpensive at $30 per 6,  it flies very well  and has tremendous stopping power. Surely a recommended product!

 
     

Manufacturer data:

New Archery Products Inc

Thunderhead 125

Aluminum ferrule with Steel chisel point

3 Blades 125 grains broadhead

Replaceable blades, Diamize sharpening

http://www.newarchery.com

   
       
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